Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Wildflower Wednesday - Goldenrod






These wild goldenrod are actually looking pretty gangly in my yard, and I'm in the process of cutting them down before they went to seed, but they sure look pretty up close, and attract some interesting insects...like the beauty above.  Never seen a bug colored like this before!  (Sue of A Corner Garden tells me it's a Ailanthus Moth ...and here I was thinking it was a beetle!)


You can check out more beautiful wildflowers, and link up your own wild finds at Wildflower Wednesday.  And you can find more bugs (and animals) at...


8 comments:

  1. I've seen exactly the same but in someone else's post, but we don't have it here in the tropics. Those yellow blooms are so plenty, i guess a lot of insects are happy there. I wonder why you didn't see the butterflies, don't they like it?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hmm...I don't know. Maybe the butterflies are scared off by all the bees. There were a lot of those...I just didn't post them this time.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love all the goldenrods, and yes, the native ones that has stolons are pretty aggressive in wet areas. Thanks for the reminder.~~Dee

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi, I came here from Gail's blog. I know what you mean about goldenrods sprawling around. I like them, though.

    I live in Nebraska, and we have those moths. I just looked it up on my blog, to find the name, and it is an ailanthus moth in your photo.

    ReplyDelete
  5. it is really pretty!

    ReplyDelete
  6. The goldenrod looks really great for a pollen source but I'm thinking about all those little blossoms turning into seeds and blowing. Do they self-sow rampantly, and do you clip off the seed heads before they blow?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Yep...they self-sow very rapidly. I learned the hard way last year. This year I hope to cut them back before that can happen. Got half way through and it got cold so I'm putting it off...but can't wait too long.

    ReplyDelete
  8. One of my favorite wildflower plants for attracting and feeding pollinators. I even like them when they've gone to seed and add architecture to the garden all winter!

    ReplyDelete